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Thread: Fly Casting

  1. #1

    Exclamation Fly Casting

    I was reading some of the posts here and thought of a question for you fellow fly fisherman. I have been fly fishing a few times in my life but have just recently taken it up again after a few year hiatus. I was never an expert so I am having to relearn a lot of things, easier than learning them for the fist time yes, but still tedious at times.

    I went to the park the other day and did some casting practice. I have a 5-6wt, 4 piece Browning (of course ) fly rod and a 5-6 Redington reel. WF-F line as well. I was doing some reading on casting in my fly fisherman magazine and it was saying, basically, (paraphrasing) that on your cast, both forward and back, that it is important to "abruptly" stop your hand/arm on the back and forward cast in order to get the most distance etc out of the cast. So I tried that, problem is, my fly rod, as I'm sure most fly rods are, is particularly flimsy in that they are so long they wiggle a lot, like a fast action rod. So I find it hard to abruptly stop anything due to the residual movement of the rod after the cast has stopped. I think this is messing up my cast. Any ideas/tips?

    Thanks
    Brown

  2. #2

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    Hello B-Man, Sounds like you may have a fast action rod to slow it down some try a 4 wt line on it. I would get 1 of mine out but these white things are falling out the sky at this time with a few inches on the ground also. The Cabela's rod I have is fast and wiggles at the end of the cast, but if you stop your arm, shouldn't move the wrist, at 11-10 o-clock positionyou should get the most from the cast
    tying flys so I can fly ties

  3. #3
    JoeW
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    Good pointers from HC! I prefer to use very stiff action fly rods (I always forget whether stiff mean "fast" or "slow"!). That vibration of the tip causes the line to loose a lot of speed, thus reducing your cast. And here's a tip, on your backcast, "snap" the rod up to around 11 o'clock, then slowly drift the rod further backward to about 1 o'clock. Pause, then snap forward to 10 o'clock and as your line flies forward, slowly lower rod to 9 o'clock. Start off with shorter casts- just 20 feet or so, until you get the timing done. Heck, 90% of my fly caught trout are caught within 30 feet anyhow!

    One more thing, if I can explain it-- a modified "double haul". really increases line speed and gets better distance. Before you lift the line front in front of you to start your backcast, grab the line with your free hand as far up the rod as you can reach. As you snap rod back, also pull down on the line your holding. As the line shoots backward, allow your hand holding the line to move back up the rod, then as you snap the rod forward and your line is going forward, release the line your holding. It should "shoot" out the rod. It's tough to master and is a lot of work, though. I save this just for when I need to make longer casts.

    Would be a lot easier to show you, but like HC- we've got white fluffy "rain" coming down here, too. LOL! My fly rods are all packed away! HHave fun. Best---- JoeW

  4. #4
    Gold Member toadfrog's Avatar
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    Now that is out of my league. The wind weather in OK changes faster than switching the tv channel. not to mention the brush an undergrowth everywhere.

  5. #5
    tying flys so I can fly ties

  6. #6
    Moderator bass or bass?'s Avatar
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    As you move your arm back and forth, use a strong decisive wrist snap at the end of each stroke back and forth. This will accelerate your line and close the loop of the line too. Keep your rod angles at the end of each stroke at 11:00 and 1:00 for best line speed/distance.
    "Channels are cool, but Flatheads rule!"
    ~Outdoor-Fishing Pro Staff~A.C.C.A.~BoatU.S.~N.R.A.~

  7. #7
    JoeW
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    Just don't drop the rod too far down on your backcast or you'll end up with a fly in you hat, or ear! Snap back to 11 o'clock, then drift back to 1 o'clock. Anything further back and your looking for trouble! Sound like I've been there and done that?

    Interestingly-- "vintage" directions for fly casting said to practice on the water with a dollar bill tucked between your casting elbow and your body. Casting was supposed to be all forearm and wrist and if you used your whole arm, you'd lose the dollar! I guess you'd learn quickly that way. But more modern ideas, and shorter rods, now say to use the whole arm. Heck- it's easy- don't sell yourself short! Best---- JoeW

  8. #8

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    All sounds like good advice, and I will utilize it in my casting practice. I watched a video on my Fly Fisherman website, which is also the same as the article in my FF magazine, that said to not break your wrist, keep your leading foot, arm, elbow etc all lined up and it did mention using a book between your casting arm and body to prevent you from throwing your arm out. Said to pull out 30' of line to start and cast that. I want to get my casting out further than 30' and although I haven't measured, it doesn't feel like 30'. My rod tip continues to wobble and I suppose this is something I will have to contend with. Will keep working on it and update the progress.

    Thanks all
    Brown
    ..."Tis the chance to wash one's soul with pure air, with the rush of the brook, or with the shimmer of the sun on the blue water. It brings meekness and inspiration from the decency of nature, charity toward tackle makers, patience toward fish, a mockery of profits and egos, a quieting of hate, a rejoicing that you do not have to decide a darn thing until next week, and it is discipline in the equality of men, for all men are equal before fish"...

  9. #9
    JoeW
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    Experiment-- whatever works for you! I have short arms, and unless I use my whole arm in casting I can't get the line up high enough. You have to use your wrist and arm--- subtly, but you have to. Otherwise you'll be throwing the line straight back at you instead of back and up over your head. When you do a backcast, turn around and take a quick look-- the line should be a tight backwards shaped "C" and shouldn't drop lower than your head. Fly casting IS hard work-- you have to "force" that rod to bend and do the casting for you-- don't baby it!

    Geez, when I was teaching 10 graders, they "found out" that I fly fished. So at the end of the year and final exams done, I had an extra day. Took the whole class out into the courtyard with an 8-wgt outfit, and "taught them" how to fly cast. A bunch of other teachers saw us, and brought THEIR classes out! Geez, one kid put out a cast of 50 feet! But you know- the girls picked it up quicker than the guys.

    I wanna go fly fishing! Best---- JoeW

    PS- I really like that quote in your signature!

  10. #10

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    Thanks! Me too!

    Herbert Hoover said it best.

    Brown
    ..."Tis the chance to wash one's soul with pure air, with the rush of the brook, or with the shimmer of the sun on the blue water. It brings meekness and inspiration from the decency of nature, charity toward tackle makers, patience toward fish, a mockery of profits and egos, a quieting of hate, a rejoicing that you do not have to decide a darn thing until next week, and it is discipline in the equality of men, for all men are equal before fish"...

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